We’ve all heard assumptions that are repeated so often that they become accepted as facts. We call these speculations factoids. According to Jolene Creighton in her article “50 Facts that are really Factoids”, a fact is based on observations repeatedly verified. This is especially true in science. Yet even here, the facts may evolve. If the context or tools of observation change, it may turn out not to be a fact any longer. But this process of verification is not present when we look at a factoid. Here we have statements “based on an assumption—something that has never been confirmed.” Sometimes websites act like factoids, full of assumptions and speculations that have not been verified. In this exercise we will look at a factoid or a suspicious website and examine its veracity. Read the prompt below “7 why should I trust this” – find a factoid or suspicious website (you can do your own search, ask friends, or check sites below for examples). – observe all you can about it. – check for previous fact-checking (explore fact checking websites about this factoid or site) – go upstream (trace claim to an original source; check other sites that say same thing and look if there is common evidence) – if possible, read laterally (check what other people have written about the factoid or website). – write report (one paragraph that presents the factoid or website, main characteristics, your research, your analysis). – write reflection (what have you learned doing this research?) after you are done, – In Ex 7 Factoids Google Doc folder, read two classmates’ reports and respond to them. BE CAREFUL – make comments but do not erase or edit anything!!https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fake_news_websites_i…https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_common_misco…https://middlebury.libguides.com/internet/fact-che…Bb Blackboard
2020 F
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Trulia: Real
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Exercise 7
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Slack | gene x
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classroom.google.com/c/MTU5MDkyMDg1NDc2/a/MTgxNDEXMTAONzgy/details
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img.webp 8 PM)
Open with
:
IcNair – Truth & Lies
evidence
if possible, read laterally
write report (one paragr
write reflection (what ha
(O)
Common MythConceptions
World’s most contagious falsehoods
Bubbles size
rulence of idea
(google)
BODY
FOOD
HISTORY LAW MIND NATURE RELIGION SCIENCE SPORT
after you are done,
– In Ex 7 Factoids Google
comments but do not eras
The Vomitorium
Not a room Romans used for
Bacchanalian binges, but the
name for the entrance to a
stadium
Different tongue parts
There are no different sections
for each taste bitter,sou
salty, sweet & umami
savoury meaty
Electric fan @ night
Big myth in South Korea that
this is deadly. Very unlikely
to harm you. Unless you put
the fan in the bed
Sharks = no cancer
Oh yes they do get cancer
Particularly skin cancer
7 why
PDF
Black holes
Not really holes but hugely
dense objects with massive
gravitational pull
Wake sleepwalkers?
Theyl be really confused
but it’s okay. They’re more
likely to hurt themselves it
theyre not awoken
Napoleon was short
Atal tale. At 57, he was
actually above average height
for a Frenchman
of the time
Bulls hate red
Bulls are colour-blind
They actually react to motions
of the builfighter’s cloth
as a perceived threat
img.
Image
Fake
https:
Great Wall of China
Not visible from space. Myth
Now stop saying it!
Missing persons reports
Police dont demand
a 24-hour period before
accepting a missing
persons report
Bananas grow on trees
Actually grow on massive
herbs that resemble trees. Bet
you didn’t know that
Oil stops stuck pasta
Nope. But it can stop
the water foaming
or boiling over
Dogs sweat by salivating
No. They regulate temperature
through panting. They actually
sweat through footpads
Body heat & the head
Only in infants is most
heat lost through the head. Or
the head is the only
uncovered part of the body
Vikings’ homed helms
Actually created by a costume
designer for a 19th-century
Wagner opera
Bats are blind
Don’t be fact-blind! Bats can
not only see. They can also
use echolocation. That’s why
they’re so awesome!
Exercise
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11:20
Bb Blackboard
2020 F
X
M Your questio X
S Ask a new
SY CUNY Login x
Trulia: Real
X
W 202010062 x
Exercise 7
х
Slack | gene x
+
D
x
c
classroom.google.com/c/MTU5MDkyMDE1NDc2/a/MTgxNDEXMTAONzgy/details
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7 why should I trust this, understanding sources.pdf
Open with Google Docs
:
evidence
if possible, read o
write report one
write reflection
4 – THE WRITER’S PRACTICE
likely to shift. Ofren our beliefs change when we realize an exis
Our values, on the other hand, are relatively immutable,
you are fulfilling your responsibilities to the audience. Claiming
If you are striving to be accurate, fair, truthful, and transparent
objectivity is a lie, and we definitely try not to lie to our audiences
ing belief is in conflict with our underlying values
after you are done
– In Ex 7 Factoids
comments but do
Why Should I Trust This?
(Understanding Sources)
In a study conducted between January and June 2016, researchers
Stanford University tested the “civic online reasoning ability of
more than 7,800 middle school and high school students across twelve
states.
The study defined “civic online reasoning” as “The ability to eval:
uate digital content and reach warranted conclusions about social
and political issues: (1) identifying who’s behind the information
presented, (2) evaluating the evidence presented, and (3) investigating
what other sources say“ (http://www.aft.org/ae/fall2017/megrew
_ortega_breakstone_wineburg).
The Stanford researchers found the results “disturbing.”
Essentially, they found these middle school and high school stu-
dents to be easily fooled by misinformation. In one task, fewer
than to percent of those tested were able to identify a website pre-
senting itself as a neutral source on minimum wage laws and regu-
lations as what was in reality the product of a partisan group linked
to the US restaurant industry.
These findings are not surprising, and the difficulty of navigating
the flood of content on the Internet is not limited to middle school
and high school students. Much of the information we encounter on
the Internet presents itself as true without offering any obvious way
Exercise
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Bb Blackboard
2020 Fa
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S Ask a new q X
SY CUNY Login x
Trulia: Real
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Exercise 7
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Slack | genex
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classroom.google.com/c/MTU5MDkyMDg1NDc2/a/MTgxNDEXMTAONzgy/details
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7 why should I trust this, understanding sources.pdf
= Open with Google Docs
:
Revente Argum
THE WRITER’S PRACTICE
10
evidence)
if possible, read
write report (one
write reflection
identify one is to be alert to a moment when your own confirma
tion bias may have kicked in: when you see information you des
perately want to be true, but that desire is so intense, it may be
overriding the rational part of your brain.
to judge its veracity Factor in the influence of confirmation in
our willingness to accept something as true as long as it aligns with
our existing beliefs, and we have an online atmosphere that makes
sery difficult to discern what is true and what is not
the words of the Stanford researchers, “Credible information is to
It is important to be able to make these distinctions, because
civic engagement what clean air and water are to public health
Determining the accuracy and trustworthiness of online info
mation benefits from a process called “lateral reading.” which in
2. Examine the questionable claim
after you are done
– In Ex 7 Factoids
comments but do
Rather than examining the source itself for clues to its validity, use
the tools of the Internet to find out as much as you can about the
Mike Caulfield, a professor and director of blended and networked
learning at Washington State University Vancouver, recommends a
hree-step process (http://hapgood.us/2017/09/04/how-news-literacy
claim and the source.
-gets-the-web-wrong):
volves leaving the source you’re trying to assess
This experience has two purposes:
1. To practice a process for checking online information for a
curacy.
2. To spread the word to others about how to do this, by describ.
ing the process you used to determine whether a particular
fact or source was reliable or unreliable.
AUDIENCE
Imagine someone has come to you with a source or fact, and
they’re not sure if it’s true or not. They’ve asked you for help in de
termining its accuracy but also in better understanding why they
should trust or not trust the information. Your piece should leave
the audience better armed to engage in their own online fact
checking process having learned from your example.
1. Check for previous fact-checking work
2. Go upstream from the source
3. Read laterally
The quickest way to check on a questionable claim is to see if
someone else had a similar suspicion and if they’ve already studied
the issue. A quick web search asking if something you’re not sure
about is true may lead you to a fact-checking website that discusses
the claim and the evidence. While this may not be sufficient to sat-
isfy the whole question, you’re in the midst of an ongoing discus-
sion about the claim rather than isolated, trying to assess the claim
only by looking at the original source.
By going “upstream,” Caulfield means tracing the claim to its
original source. If we can find the original source, we stand a bet-
ter chance of understanding the origins of the claim.
For example, you may have heard a factoid floating around say
ing something like 65 percent of children will work in jobs that
don’t yet exist. Benjamin Doxtdator, a teacher and education
PROCESS
1. Find a source you want to check.
Potentially dubious sources are pretty easy to locate. They fre
quently circulate on social media. A good way to potentially
Exercise
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Bb Blackboard
2020 F
X
M Your questiox
S Ask a new q X
SY CUNY Login x
Trulia: Real
X
W 202010062 x
Exercise 7: F X
Slack | genex
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D
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c classroom.google.com/c/MTU5MDkyMDg1NDc2/a/MTgxNDEXMTAONzgy/details
you know that?” Once you have answers
7 why should I trust this, understanding sources.pdf
= Open with Google Docs
:
evidence
if possible, read
write report (one
write reflection
Research and Aage 145
Jus – THE WRITER’S PRACTICE
REFLECT
after you are done
– In Ex 7 Factoids
comments but do I
Practicing the kind of web literacy Mike Caulfield champions is
vital to navigating today’s information economy, but also believe
embracing an inherently more critical stance toward the informa
rion we encounter will allow us to keep from being so easily fooled
Reflect on this experience. Can you think of anything like me
with the lion cub and elephant-that you now suspect might not
be true?
REMIX
a lion cub in its trunk, with
the lion, the elephant
I have put two deliberate errors of fact into the introduction to this
experience. Neither alters any important meaning, but they’re in
accuracies nonetheless. Who knows, there may be unintentional
errors as well. My desire is to make everything in this book as ac
curate as possible, but mistakes can still happen. Can you find and
correct them? If you Tweet them to me @biblioracle, I’ll respond
to tell you if you’re correct.
Imagine you run across something you suspect is dubious, but you
don’t have the benefit of outside research to compile a convincin
case. What could you do to convince an audience that the door
claim is untrue or at least sufficiently questionable that they
ro circulate it further?
shouldn’t be so quick to circulate it furth
For example, in early April of 2018 I was delighted to see in
the Twitter feed for the Kruger National Park in South Africa
the mother lion walking alongside. The caption said that to belp
picture of an African elephant cradling a lion
carried the cub for three kilometers
How cute! I thought. When my wife got home, I cagerly told
her about it, this amazing sight at a game reserve in South Africa
My wife, a veterinarian deeply knowledgeable about all things ar
imal, declared such a thing impossible. “They’re natural enemies.”
1 dug through my Twitter feed for the picture, ready to prove
her wrong. Just as I was about to triumphantly produce the photo
I noticed the exact date on the tweet: April 1, 2018.
The post was a hoax put out by the park. Looking more closely,
I could see it wasn’t even a particularly good Photoshop job, but I
had been fooled because part of me wanted to believe that real-life
wild animals could enact something out of The Lion King.
As another example, take that factoid about 65 percent of the
jobs today’s children will one day hold not yet existing. Could you
at least create doubt among those who believe that this is so true
it’s not worth questioning? How much have jobs changed? What
jobs are new today that didn’t exist
with the same title changed so much l Page
4
the same, the job itself has changed? Does that count
Exercise
ago Have jobs
+
+ i 11:19
Bb Blackboard
2020 F
х
M Your questio X
S Ask a new a
SY CUNY Login x
Trulia: Real
X
W 202010062 x
Exercise 7
х
Slack | gene x
+
D
Х
C
classroom.google.com/c/MTU5MDkyMDg1NDc2/a/MTgxNDEXMTAONzgy/details
*
img.webp 8 PM)
Open with
:
IcNair – Truth & Lies
evidence
if possible, read laterally
write report (one paragr
write reflection (what ha
(O)
Common MythConceptions
World’s most contagious falsehoods
Bubbles size
rulence of idea
(google)
BODY
FOOD
HISTORY LAW MIND NATURE RELIGION SCIENCE SPORT
after you are done,
– In Ex 7 Factoids Google
comments but do not eras
The Vomitorium
Not a room Romans used for
Bacchanalian binges, but the
name for the entrance to a
stadium
Different tongue parts
There are no different sections
for each taste bitter,sou
salty, sweet & umami
savoury meaty
Electric fan @ night
Big myth in South Korea that
this is deadly. Very unlikely
to harm you. Unless you put
the fan in the bed
Sharks = no cancer
Oh yes they do get cancer
Particularly skin cancer
7 why
PDF
Black holes
Not really holes but hugely
dense objects with massive
gravitational pull
Wake sleepwalkers?
Theyl be really confused
but it’s okay. They’re more
likely to hurt themselves it
theyre not awoken
Napoleon was short
Atal tale. At 57, he was
actually above average height
for a Frenchman
of the time
Bulls hate red
Bulls are colour-blind
They actually react to motions
of the builfighter’s cloth
as a perceived threat
img.
Image
Fake
https:
Great Wall of China
Not visible from space. Myth
Now stop saying it!
Missing persons reports
Police dont demand
a 24-hour period before
accepting a missing
persons report
Bananas grow on trees
Actually grow on massive
herbs that resemble trees. Bet
you didn’t know that
Oil stops stuck pasta
Nope. But it can stop
the water foaming
or boiling over
Dogs sweat by salivating
No. They regulate temperature
through panting. They actually
sweat through footpads
Body heat & the head
Only in infants is most
heat lost through the head. Or
the head is the only
uncovered part of the body
Vikings’ homed helms
Actually created by a costume
designer for a 19th-century
Wagner opera
Bats are blind
Don’t be fact-blind! Bats can
not only see. They can also
use echolocation. That’s why
they’re so awesome!
Exercise
Q
+
+
11:20

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