WEEK ONE LECTURE SUMMARIESIf you are unable to participate in a Blackboard Collaborate chat session because of unanticipated events or circumstances beyond your control, it is important that you review the archived session in detail to see what was discussed and see the explanations and answers to questions that were addressed. Then write a 1-2 page summary and submit it to this assignment tab by Saturday midnight (Pacific time) of this week. You may be given full or partial credit for the chat session based on the quality of the written submission.TextbookLimbrunner, G.F. & D’Allaird, C. (2015). Applied Statics and Strength of Materials. (6th ed). New York City, NY: Prentice Hall/Pearson.ISBN-13: 978-0-13-384054-4 Chapters 1 and 2Laith Al Any
February 3, 2021
Class #2
Overview
 Review Chapter 1
 Discuss Chapter 2
 Homework &
Deadlines
Spatial Reasoning
https://www.fibonicci.com/spatial-reasoning/
Chapter 1 Review
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Mechanics Overview
Applications of Statics
Mathematics of Statics
Calculations and Numerical Accuracy
Calculations and Dimensional Analysis
Units for Statics and Strength of Materials
Example: Unit Conversion
Poll
What is your field of study?
A. Construction
B. Manufacturing Design
C. Biomedical Engineering Technology
D. Electrical & Computer Engineering
Week 1 Threaded Discussion
What field of study are you in? Give an example of a
problem in your field of study that needs an
understanding of principles of statics. Describe the
information that you would need to begin solving that
problem.
Weekly Learning Outcomes
 By the end of Week 1, you should be able to:
 Develop an understanding of engineering mechanics as
it applies to statics
 Solve statics problems with proper significant figures
and units
 Describe the qualities of a force and how the
principles of force affect a body at rest
 Analyze the types of forces (loads) that act on a
structure
Applied Statics and Strength
of Materials
CHAPTER
2
Principles of Statics
Applied Statics and Strength of Materials, 6e
George F. Limbrunner, Craig T. D A
̉ llaird
Copyright © 2016 by Pearson Education, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Chapter 2 Overview
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Forces and Effects of Forces (change motion or deform)
Characteristics of a Force
Units of Force (pound, kip, ton, newton)
Types of Forces
Scalar and Vector Quantities
Principle of Transmissibility
Types of Force Systems
Orthogonal Concurrent Forces: Resultants and
Components
2.2 Characteristics of a Force
2.4 Types of Forces
 Concentrated force
 Small area; acts at a point
 Distributed force
 Large area
 Examples: snow on roof, water/wind pressure
 Units: pounds per square foot (psf or lb/ft2)
 Distributed load
 Force spread out over line or narrow strip of area
 Examples: weight of a beam
 Units: kips/ft or N/m
2.5 Scalar and Vector Quantities
 Scalar
 Only magnitude
 Algebraic addition
 Time, volume, population,
etc.
 Vector
 Magnitude & direction
 Vector addition
 Push, pull, velocity, etc.
2.7 Types of Force Systems
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Coplanar concurrent
Coplanar non-concurrent
Coplanar parallel
Non-planar concurrent
Non-planar non-concurrent
Non-planar parallel
 When all forces act in a single plane, the forces
are said to be coplanar.
 A system of several forces is concurrent when all
forces acting on the body have the same point of
application.
 Or the lines of action of the forces intersect at a
common point.
Name that Coplanar Force System
a) Coplanar concurrent
b) Coplanar non-concurrent
c) Coplanar parallel
Name that Coplanar Force System
a) Coplanar concurrent
b) Coplanar non-concurrent
c) Coplanar parallel
Name that Coplanar Force System
a) Coplanar concurrent
b) Coplanar non-concurrent
c) Coplanar parallel
2.8 Components of a Force Vector
Breaking down forces into two components at right angles to
each other, called rectangular components, are most useful
when solving problems with multiple forces.
Usually determined in the
horizontal & vertical direction.
Also found in any two directions
at right angles to each other.
Governing Equations for Force
Components (Fx)
From the definition of
the cosine of an angle:
Governing Equations for Force
Components (Fy)
From the definition of
the sine of an angle:
Governing Equations for Force
Components
 Fx = F cos qx
 Fy = F sin qx
 ALWAYS make a drawing
showing the components
of the force vector
 ALWAYS label the
components as + or –
Find the rectangular components
of this force
Find the components of this
inclined wind force F = 600N
at 30 degrees from y-axis
30
 Fx = F cos qx
 Fy = F sin qx
 ALWAYS make a drawing
showing the components
of the force vector
 ALWAYS label the
components as + or –
Comments or thoughts about chapter discussed today?
Homework: Due midnight Sunday
 Click on heading for Week 1 Assignment
 Word or PDF file only
 Ch. 1 – Introduction
 1.1, 1.2, 1.6, 1.10, 1.13, 1.14, 1.20, 1.22, 1.23, 1.26
 1.5 points each; 15 points total
 Ch. 2 – Principles of Statics
 2.3, 2.5, 2.14, 2.18, 2.20
 2 points each; 10 points total
Summary
 Reviewed Chapter 1
 Threaded Discussion
 Discussed Chapter 2
 Characteristics of a Force
 Types of Forces
 Scalar and Vector Quantities
 Types of Force Systems
 Force Components
 Homework
Weekly Learning Outcomes
 By the end of Week 1, you should be able to:
 Develop an understanding of engineering mechanics as
it applies to statics
 Solve statics problems with proper significant figures
and units
 Describe the qualities of a force and how the principles
of force affect a body at rest
 Analyze the types of forces (loads) that act on a
structure
Week 1 Summary & Week 2 Preview
Week 1 Principles of Statics
Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 2 Principles of Statics
Week 2 Equilibrium
Chapter 3 Resultants of Coplanar Force Systems
Chapter 4 Equilibrium of Coplanar Force Systems
Assignments Due
Homework #1
Threaded Discussion
Quiz 1
Homework #2
Threaded Discussion
Midterm Exam
Week 3 Centroids & Moments of Inertia
Chapter 5 Analysis of Structures
Chapter 7 Centroids and Centers of Gravity
Chapter 8 Area Moments of Inertia
Week 4 Stress and Strain
Chapter 9 Stresses and Strains
Chapter 10 Properties of Materials
Homework #3
Threaded Discussion
Quiz 2
Homework #4
Threaded Discussion
Final Exam
Quiz 1
 Available noon Friday (2/5) through midnight Sunday
(2/7)
 10 questions
 T/F, multiple choice, matching, ordering, problem
solving
 60 minutes, auto-submit at end of time
 Random blocks of questions, randomized questions
Laith Al Any
February 1, 2021
Class #1
Overview
 Course Outline
 Textbook Chapter 1
 Homework &
Deadlines
Engineering Problem Solving
Poll
How many classes have you already taken on-line?
A. 0 (this is my first one)
B. 1-2
C. 3-4
D. 5+ (I’m a pro at taking on-line classes)
Course Outline
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Learning outcomes
Schedule
Grading
Homework
Threaded Discussion
Midterm & Final exam
General NU policies
1. Course Learning Outcomes
 Describe the basic principles of engineering statics.
 Contrast equilibrium of a particle and equilibrium of a rigid




body.
Understand major principles of stress and strain
Solve problems using the major principles of strength of
materials.
Compare and contrast applications of the strength of
materials in construction, manufacturing, biomedical, and
electrical engineering.
Apply methods of calculating centroids and moments of
inertia for bodies that are combinations of simple
geometric shapes.
2. Schedule
Week 1 Principles of Statics
Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 2 Principles of Statics
Week 2 Equilibrium
Chapter 3 Resultants of Coplanar Force Systems
Chapter 4 Equilibrium of Coplanar Force Systems
Assignments Due
Homework #1
Threaded Discussion
Quiz 1
Homework #2
Threaded Discussion
Midterm Exam
Week 3 Centroids & Moments of Inertia
Chapter 5 Analysis of Structures
Chapter 7 Centroids and Centers of Gravity
Chapter 8 Area Moments of Inertia
Week 4 Stress and Strain
Chapter 9 Stresses and Strains
Chapter 10 Properties of Materials
Spatial reasoning
Homework #3
Threaded Discussion
Quiz 2
Homework #4
Threaded Discussion
Final Exam
3. Grading: 1000 points total
100 points = Homework (25 points/week)
100 points = Threaded Discussion (25 points/week)
200 points = Quiz (1 and 2) (100 points/quiz).
250 points = Midterm Exam
350 points = Final Exam
4. Homework
 Partial credit can be given if you get the wrong
numerical answer but I can see some correct elements
in your problem solving process.
 Submitted to the Assignment tab by midnight on
Sunday for each week (1, 2, and 3) and by midnight on
Saturday for week 4.
 10% will be deducted for each day that the homework
is late.
 No assignments will be accepted after the solutions are
discussed in class.
Poll
Are you currently using headphones so that you can use
audio to answer questions during our Collaborate
sessions?
✓ YES
X NO
5. Threaded Discussion
Grading
(On a scale of
Quality of Information
0-25)
0-15 points =
Response is not related to the
Low
assignment; irrelevant remarks are
performance
made; response did not answer all
questions.
15-20 points = Response is related to topic;
Moderate
supporting details or examples are not
performance
included in sufficient breadth or
depth; the author simply restates
concepts made by others (textbook,
instructor).
20-25 points = Supporting details and examples are
High
both broad and deep; the author
performance
shows originality and does not restate
the textbook or instructor; all
questions are answered.
Delivery of Information
Poor spelling and grammar,
“hasty” appearance, professional
vocabulary not used, and attitude
negative or indifferent.
Few grammatical or spelling
errors, professional vocabulary
used most of the time, and
positive attitude displayed
frequently.
Consistent grammatically correct
posts with professional
vocabulary, no misspellings, and
positive attitude displayed
throughout.
6. Exams
 Quiz 1
 Covers week 1.
 Midterm exam
 Covers material in Weeks 1 & 2
 Quiz 2
 Covers week 3.
 Final exam
 Comprehensive, focuses on material in Weeks 3 & 4
 You must take the exam in one sitting; the exam will
automatically save and close after time allotted.
 If you have handwritten work on the problem solving questions,
you may submit it as a PDF to the Handwritten Notes area of
Blackboard. If your answer is wrong, but I see the work
attempted, you may get partial credit for the exam question.
7. General NU Policies
 Academic honesty is highly valued at each National
University Campus. Students should always submit
their assignments that represent their original words
or ideas. If any words or ideas are used that do not
represent the student’s original words or ideas, the
student must cite all relevant sources.
 A score of zero will be given if your homework is
copied from another student submission, instructor
solutions or another internet source.
 http://www.nu.edu/OurPrograms/StudentServices/Ac
ademicPoliciesandP.html
Comments or questions about course outline?
Weekly Learning Outcomes
 By the end of Week 1, you should be able to:
 Develop an understanding of engineering
mechanics as it applies to statics
 Describe the four qualities of a force and how the
principles of force affect a body at rest
 Analyze the types of forces (loads) that act on a
structure
 Solve statics problems with proper significant
figures and units
Applied Statics and Strength
of Materials
CHAPTER
1
Introduction
Applied Statics and Strength of Materials, 6e
George F. Limbrunner, Craig T. D A
̉ llaird
Copyright © 2016 by Pearson Education, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Chapter 1 Overview
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Mechanics Overview
Applications of Statics
Mathematics of Statics
Calculations and Numerical Accuracy
Calculations and Dimensional Analysis
Units for Statics and Strength of Materials
1. Mechanics Overview
Why study statics and strength of
materials?
 Statics, one of the oldest branches of science,
is the study of forces and the effect of forces
on physical systems that are in equilibrium.
 Strength of materials, or mechanics of materials,
establishes…
 The connection between the external forces applied
to a physical system.
 The resulting deflections or deformations of that
system.
 The intensity of the internal forces (stress) in the
system.
2. Applications of Statics
 Bridges and skyscrapers
 Screwdrivers, hinges, springs, & mechanical
components found in virtually all consumer products
 There will always be improvements in materials,
manufacturing processes & construction methods.
Applications of Statics
The Grand Canyon Skywalk is a
cantilevered, horseshoe-shaped
walkway, opened to tourism in 2007.
The walkway was engineered to withstand 100 mph winds & a
magnitude 8.0 earthquake.
Applications of Statics
2007 collapse of the I-35W Mississippi river bridge in
Minnesota where 13 people died.
Collapse due to
inadequate strength
or overloading of
critical members.
Public perception is
usually that poor
engineering design is
to blame.
Applications of Strength of
Materials
 Early in the morning of June 28, 1983, a 100-ft by 3-lane
section of the Mianus River Bridge on I-95 in
Greenwich, Connecticut, collapsed.

Metal corrosion and fatigue in the bridge’s supporting
structure, had gone unnoticed due to deferred maintenance.
 In 1986, more than 86,000 Bjork-Shiley Convexo-
Concave mechanical heart valves were recalled.

Metal fractures would cause a patient’s heart to contract
& require immediate emergency surgery.
From 1997 to 2006, there were 818
crane-related fatalities in the U.S.
The size of these
structures (20 to 30 stories
high)
and magnitudes of their
loads & counterbalances
makes them susceptible to
tipping and collapse due
to unbalanced forces.
Force
To describe a force, we need to specify:
Magnitude – given by a certain number of force units.
2. Direction – which may be may be given by the angle
the force makes with a selected reference axis.
3. Point of application – the point at which force is
applied.
1.
Systems of forces can be calculated mathematically
using geometry
Poll
I would rate my ability in solving geometric problems as:
A. I hate geometry.
B. Ok – if I have the formulas handy nearby
C. Good – me and my scientific calculator work well
together
D. I’m a geometry genius!
3. Mathematics of Statics
Examples: Ladder and roof truss
with right triangles
1.6 TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS
Sides b and c of the triangle form angle A.
Sides a and c form angle B.
The right angle is angle C.
The side c opposite the right angle is called the
hypotenuse.
Formulas for Right Triangles
– Tangent
• tan A
– Sine
• sin A
– Cosine of
the angle A
• cos A
Two other relationships are helpful
in the analysis of right triangles
 The first states that the sum of the three angles in
any triangle is always equal to 180 degrees.
• The second relationship, applied only to right
triangles, is known as the Pythagorean theorem:
The square of the hypotenuse is equal to
the sum of the squares of the remaining two sides.
Example 1.3: Load-bearing cables
with oblique triangles
Law of Cosines
Law of Sines
Example 1.4: Cable-supported rigging
boom with oblique triangles
6. SI Units and Symbols
As a general rule, solve problems in
the same units as those used to
give data for the problem.
Significant Digits
 Accuracy of a numerical value is often expressed in
terms of significant digits the value contains.
 Any nonzero digit is considered significant.

Zeroes to the left or right of digit sequence are used to locate
the decimal point and are not considered significant.
 The numbers 0.00345, 3.45 3450, and 3,450,000
all contain three significant digits.
 The accuracy of a solution can be no greater than the
accuracy of the data on which it is based.
Comments or thoughts about chapters discussed today?
Homework: Due midnight Sunday
 Click on heading for Week 1 Assignment
 Single Word or PDF file only
 Ch. 1 – Introduction
 1.1, 1.2, 1.6, 1.10, 1.13, 1.14, 1.20, 1.22, 1.23, 1.26
 1.5 points each; 15 points total
 Ch. 2 – Principles of Statics
 2.3, 2.5, 2.14, 2.18, 2.20
 2 points each; 10 points total
Summary
 Course Outline
 Chapter 1
 Homework
 Quiz 1
Weekly Learning Outcomes
 By the end of Week 1, you should be able to:
• Develop an understanding of engineering
mechanics as it applies to statics
• Solve statics problems with proper significant
figures and units
• Describe the four qualities of a force and how the
principles of force affect a body at rest
• Analyze the types of forces (loads) that act on a
structure

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