Task: The multiple-source essay asks you to synthesize the arguments of at least 10
sources
· Length: 2000-3000 words
· Format: APAI am attaching a 6 source essay that you have previously written for me. Also addition 4 sources which needs to be added and write an Literature Review.Disclaimer: This is a machine generated PDF of selected content from our databases. This functionality is provided solely for your
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As concern about kids’ mental health and social media use
grows, authorities take action
Date: Feb. 5, 2019
From: CNN Wire
Publisher: CNN Newsource Sales, Inc.
Document Type: Article
Length: 772 words
Content Level: (Level 5)
Lexile Measure: 1530L
Full Text:
Byline: Jack Guy, CNN
(CNN) — Concern over children’s use of social media and its effect on their mental health has increased markedly in recent years,
and now official action on the issue is also stepping up.
In the UK, government ministers are considering imposing new rules on social media companies, while a trial introducing mindfulness
exercises will be extended to up to 370 English schools.
The response comes as separate surveys have revealed feelings of “overwhelming pressure” and inadequacy among young social
media users, as well as the prevalence of online bullying.
The government proposals have been launched as part of Children’s Mental Health Week, February 4-10.
“We have heard calls for an Internet Regulator and to place a statutory ‘duty of care’ on platforms, and are seriously considering all
options,” a spokesman for Britain’s Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport said in a statement.
“Social media companies clearly need to do more to ensure they are not promoting harmful content to vulnerable people,” the
spokesman said, adding that a forthcoming document will “set out their responsibilities, how they should be met and what should
happen if they are not.”
Scrutiny of social media companies has become more intense after Molly Russell, a 14-year-old British girl, died by suicide in
November 2017.
After her death it was found that she had viewed social media content on depression, anxiety, self-harm and suicide, according to the
UK’s Press Association (PA) news agency.
Her father, Ian Russell, blamed social media algorithms for encouraging her to view related content.
And social media may also be exposing kids to other stresses.
‘Overwhelming pressure’ to succeed
According to research published January 29 by UK media regulator Ofcom, 11% of 12- to 15-year-olds said they had been bullied on
social media. The survey also found that 31% of that age group has seen something “worrying or nasty” online.
Cyberbullying is also a worry for parents, with 40% of parents of online 5- to 15-year-olds very or fairly concerned, according to the
survey.
Another piece of research from the Prince’s Trust, a leading UK charity for young people, shows that 57% of surveyed 16- to 25-yearolds say they feel social media results in an “overwhelming pressure” to succeed, and 46% say they feel “inadequate” when
comparing themselves to peers on social media.
The overall index score from the Prince’s Trust survey has remained the same since last year, at its lowest level in a decade, and
almost half of respondents get anxious feelings about their future after comparing their lives to friends on social media.
“It appears that in the last 12 months nothing has happened to improve the way young people are feeling about their lives,” said Nick
Stace, UK chief executive of the Prince’s Trust, in a statement.
“Social media has become omnipresent in the lives of young people and this research suggests it is exacerbating what is already an
uncertain and emotionally turbulent time.”
The Prince’s Trust eBay Youth Index, released February 5, is an online survey performed by global public opinion and data company
YouGov involving a total of 2,162 young people in the UK, carried out from November 13 to December 2, 2018.
Survey participants are asked how happy and confident they are in different areas of their lives. The responses are then converted
into a numerical scale between 0 and 100, where 100 denotes being entirely happy or confident, and zero being not at all happy or
confident. The latest results have been mapped against the data from the previous nine reports to show change over time.
Mindfulness lessons
Social media is just one factor in wider concerns about children’s mental health, which also include “intense pressure at school,
bullying or problems at home,” said Imran Hussain, Action for Children’s director of policy and campaigns.
In response to what Hussain called a children’s mental health crisis, education officials also announced that up to 370 schools across
England will take part in a study that will trial lessons in mindfulness.
Education Secretary Damian Hinds said the trial will be one of the largest of its kind in the world, including mindfulness exercises,
breathing exercises and relaxation techniques as well as sessions with mental health experts.
“As a society, we are much more open about our mental health than ever before, but the modern world has brought new pressures
for children, while potentially making others worse,” said Hinds in a statement.
“These trials are key to improving our understanding of how practical, simple advice can help young people cope with the pressures
they face,” he said. The study is set to run until 2021.
Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2019 CNN Newsource Sales, Inc.
http://news.blogs.cnn.com/tag/the-cnn-wire/
Source Citation (MLA 8th Edition)
“As concern about kids’ mental health and social media use grows, authorities take action.” CNN Wire, 5 Feb. 2019. Gale In Context:
College, https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A572587322/CSIC?u=umd_umuc&sid=CSIC&xid=445d4b38. Accessed 2 Oct. 2020.
Gale Document Number: GALE|A572587322
Disclaimer: This is a machine generated PDF of selected content from our databases. This functionality is provided solely for your
convenience and is in no way intended to replace original scanned PDF. Neither Cengage Learning nor its licensors make any
representations or warranties with respect to the machine generated PDF. The PDF is automatically generated “AS IS” and “AS
AVAILABLE” and are not retained in our systems. CENGAGE LEARNING AND ITS LICENSORS SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ANY
AND ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTIES FOR AVAILABILITY,
ACCURACY, TIMELINESS, COMPLETENESS, NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE. Your use of the machine generated PDF is subject to all use restrictions contained in The Cengage Learning
Subscription and License Agreement and/or the Gale Academic OneFile Terms and Conditions and by using the machine
generated PDF functionality you agree to forgo any and all claims against Cengage Learning or its licensors for your use of the
machine generated PDF functionality and any output derived therefrom.
Social media has positive effects on mental health
Author: Sanjana Kondapalli
Date: Feb. 13, 2019
From: UWIRE Text
Publisher: ULOOP Inc.
Document Type: Article
Length: 755 words
Full Text:
Byline: Sanjana Kondapalli
Browsing social media has become a staple in everyday life. -Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com
In the last 20 years or so, there has been a rapid growth in the use of social media. Enough so that some sites have aged badly
enough to be considered similar to dinosaurs, like Myspace and slowly Facebook. With it being a fairly recent creation, the millennials
and, more prominently, Generation Z have bared the brunt of its effects and ever-changing forefront, especially since many have had
to grow up with the culture. Socialization for many has changed forever, which provide positives and negatives for people’s wellbeing.
Here are several affects of social media:
Positives:
The social aspect, of course. Now people are not limited to being around the people immediately in front of them. They can explore
and converse with others from all over the world.
Not only can they further their existing relationships as another way of connecting, but also there is more opportunity to connect with
a larger base, possibly opening the doors to more choices of people and relationships.
This allows for even more interactions that may not have been possible or even existed before, creating outlets and communities. For
example, it can benefit people that have trouble with in-person contact, minority or marginalized groups, or people that have been
through the same trauma. It sometimes displays the best of humanity, with uplifting stories or messages. In this regard, social media
creates a positive impact on the world, benefiting the social aspect of a person’s well-being.
However, an online personality is not always the same as someone’s real personality. There are some that use their online presence
to augment their true personality and use their social media as an extension of who they think they are, not who they actually are.
But even in the more “real” portrayal online, social media provides a perfect avenue for people to create facades. No amount of
words, captions, pictures or even videos can completely capture what a person is really like.
Social media is an outlet for people to create a curated image, one that is thought-out and intentional, unlike what most can
accomplish in real life. This concept, however, can easily be forgotten or not realized for impressionable people, like the youth.
This leads to the negative aspect of social media.
Negatives:
What you see is what you believe and in this case that may not be beneficial.
Online personalities are not real, especially because they tend to take the best moments or best said things and string them together
to create this image. When this is not regularly acknowledged, it may create pressure on ourselves to replicate this in real life too.
And we can get so used to it, it can almost become subconscious, even for young kids. When these standards are not met, people
may feel like there is something wrong with them or that there is something missing from their lives.
Additionally, the quantification of social media through the number of followers and comments on posts, and even what is being said
in the comments, good or bad, can dictate someone’s mood or self-esteem.
Businesses know this too, and use it to their benefit to promote products to impressionable youth.
The formula for social media makes it so people will always keep coming back for more. With the lack of education in it, people can
easily let it control their life and tell them when to look at it and when to stop and how it should make them feel.
Sound like an addiction? Perhaps for those that have not understood the effects of social media. This makes less-mature people, like
young people, prime exploits.
Social media takes advantage of what makes drugs so addictive, but does it psychologically rather than chemically, using instant
gratification and impulse.
Now, some are stable on their own and know how to deal with their own emotions in healthy ways, so for them social media is just an
aid to help them. But for those still learning to deal with their thoughts, feelings, body and health in general, without regulation or
education, social media can disrupt this process. In dealing with negative emotions, similar to addictive substances, social media
could be learned to be used in response.
The goal here becomes to remove the feeling entirely. Whether it is boredom, disappoint, anger or other negative feelings, it could be
result in relief and eventually apathy.
For comments/questions about this story, email features@thewhitonline.com or tweet @TheWhitOnline.
Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2019 ULOOP Inc.
http://uwire.com/?s=UWIRE+Text&x=26&y=14&=Go
Source Citation (MLA 8th Edition)
Kondapalli, Sanjana. “Social media has positive effects on mental health.” UWIRE Text, 13 Feb. 2019, p. 1. Gale Academic OneFile,
https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A573962901/AONE?u=umd_umuc&sid=AONE&xid=e9734ab8. Accessed 2 Oct. 2020.
Gale Document Number: GALE|A573962901
Journal of Affective Disorders 275 (2020) 165–174
Contents lists available at ScienceDirect
Journal of Affective Disorders
journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
Review article
A meta-analysis of the association between adolescent social media use and
depressive symptoms
T
Elizabeth J. Ivie, Adam Pettitt, Louis J. Moses, Nicholas B. Allen

Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA
ARTICLE INFO
ABSTRACT
Keywords:
Meta-analysis
Adolesence
Depression
Social media
Background: The association of adolescent social media use with mental health symptoms, especially depression,
has recently attracted a great deal of interest in public media as well as the scientific community. Some studies
have cited statistically significant associations between adolescent social media use and depression and have
proposed that parents must regulate their adolescents’ social media use in order to protect their mental health.
Method: In order to rigorously assess the size of the effect that has been reported in the current scientific literature, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies that measured the association between social media use specifically and depressive symptoms amongst early- to mid- adolescents (11-18 years-old). We searched Psychnet,
PubMed, and Web of Science with the following terms: online social networks, social media, internet usage,
facebook, twitter, instagram, myspace, snapchat, and depression.
Results: We found a small but significant positive correlation (k=12 studies, r=.11, p
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